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Texas Frog Fest - Read more...
40 Years and Counting by Georgia Osten - Read more...
Get More Money from Your Insurance Co - Read more...
12th Annual Peninsula Bike Drive Christmas - Read more...
Shrimp - The Perfect Choice - Read more...
Crystal Beach is Open and Water is Safe - Read more...
Mardi Gras 2010 Theme Contest - Read more...
Bolivar is Back Anne Willis and Commissioner Doyle Interviews - Read more...
Texas Crab Festival and Stingaree Music Festival in May - Read more...
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Oil Spill Money Helps Texas Protect Coast
26 Aug 2014

Money paid by BP and Transocean to settle criminal penalties arising from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill has helped Texas close the largest conservation land purchase in the state’s history: Just over 17,000 acres of undisturbed coastal prairie in Calhoun County for $50 million.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation (the non-profit fundraising arm of the state’s parks department) will raise the balance of the funds — about $15 million after the oil spill funds are applied. The foundation would initially be a joint owner of the land, alongside other non-profit conservation organizations; eventually, the plan is for the land to be donated to the department itself.

Conservationists and environmental advocates hailed the purchase as a significant move to protect the state’s coast, which experts estimate is losing hundreds of acres of rural land each day. Conserving rural lands, they said, is crucial not only for preserving open spaces in Texas, but also as a way to protect water resources. Along the coast, keeping land undeveloped can serve as a “natural buffer” against sea-level rise and storm surges — often a much cheaper way to ensure hurricane protection than costly infrastructure like seawalls.

http://www.texastribune.org/2014/08/21/texas-announces-land-conservation-purchase-bp-doll/

Scientific Reasons A Texas Beach Vacation Is Necessary For Your Health
26 Aug 2014

If you don't already have a Texas size beach vacation planned, marine biologist Wallace J. Nichols's new book will make you.

Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In , On, Or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, And Better At What You Do is the result of over 10 years of research that shows how looking at water, being around it or in it coaxes our brains into releasing happy chemicals such as dopamine, serotonin and oxytocin.

Beach Vacation picture courtesy of Cinnamon Shore Port Aransas Texas


Michael Stuart's insight:

Water returns us to our natural state - This biological connection to water, Nichols told CBS News, triggers an immediate response in our brains.

We're more relaxed along the coast -  Areas of the brain associated with less stress and more empathy are activated when we look at nature scenes. While pictures of urban landscapes elicited activity in the parts of our brains associated with stress.

Looking at pictures is good, but water is even better, Water rejuvenates a tired mind


The color Blue soothes - Blue, it turns out, is the world's favorite color.

See the book at: wallacejnichols.org/126/585/bluemind

U.S. sells acreage off Texas coast to energy companies
22 Aug 2014
An auction for acreage in the western Gulf of Mexico drew more than $100 million in high bids from energy companies, the Interior Department said.

Michael Stuart's insight:

Acreage up for auction in Lease Sale 238 could lead to the production of between 116 million and 200 million barrels of oil and 538 billion and 938 billion cubic feet of natural gas - the U.S. Interior Department

The Gulf of Mexico has been and will continue to be a cornerstone of our domestic energy portfolio, with vital energy resources that spur economic opportunities and further reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

Lease sales included under a five-year energy plan outlined by President Barack Obama have generated $2.3 billion in bid revenues. A consortium of energy industry leaders called the White House to open even more offshore areas to explorers when planning the next five-year plan, which would end in 2022.

The Texas coast has an energetic future!

Texas High Court Asked To Revise Beach Property Ruling
22 Aug 2014

The First District Court reversed in favor of the state, and in July the Texas Supreme Court affirmed, with the modification that the trial court should not have awarded the Porrettos ownership of land seaward of the mean higher high-tide mark.


Michael Stuart's insight:

The Texas General Land Office told the state Supreme Court on that members of a Galveston family cannot seek judicial clarification of their property rights following the reversal of their $5 million award in litigation over the agency’s effort to seize a private beach.

In a motion for rehearing, the GLO said that while it agrees with the Texas Supreme Court’s decision to not revive a $5 million award to the Porretto family that was thrown out by a lower appeals court, the high court incorrectly concluded that the Porrettos were entitled to a declaratory judgment defining exactly what property they own.

Because the Porrettos had abandoned a “trespass to try title” action, which is the exclusive remedy under Texas law for determining who owns a disputed tract of real property, the high court was without authority to remand the case for a final judgment on the family’s property rights, the GLO claimed.

“Respectfully, the court was confined to the relief the Porrettos requested,” the motion said. “A party is not entitled to relief it does not seek.”

An attorney for the Porrettos told Law360 Tuesday that his clients have also asked for reconsideration of the ruling and suggested that the GLO filed the motion as an effort to give the high court a possible way out should it have a change of heart about the family's argument that the state committed a "temporary taking" of their property.

In July, the high court refused to revive a $5 million judgment the family scored after a state trial court concluded the GLO wrongfully laid claim to Porretto Beach and effectively killed offers from developers lined up to buy the land.

Although the state publicly claimed it owned the family’s property — then later admitted it didn't, after several offers on the property were rescinded — the Porrettos didn't suffer a “temporary taking” of their land and therefore weren't entitled to recover damages, the Texas Supreme Court ruled.

But the high court said that the family was entitled to a declaratory judgment defining their property rights and remanded the case for a final order to that effect. Instead, a decision from the First District Court of Appeals throwing out the Porrettos’ case altogether should have simply been affirmed, according to the GLO.

The fight between the Porrettos and the state involved land the family has owned for more than 40 years, including Porretto Beach, which runs along the seawall in Galveston between Sixth and 10th streets and several additional parcels the family owns between Sixth and 27th streets.

In 1994, the state leased submerged lands between 10th and 103rd streets to the city of Galveston for a beach renourishment project, according to the Porrettos.

The GLO claimed the state's property covered by the lease extended from the coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico to the annual high-tide mark, which abutted the seawall, swallowing the Porrettos' land.

But the family objected, arguing that the measurement should have been taken from roughly the “mean higher high-tide line,” which would have left them with some beach property between the seawall and the area targeted by the state for renourishment.

Rejecting the Porrettos' argument, the state went forward with the project and told the Galveston Park Board that it could issue concession licenses to allow private vendors on the rebuilt beach, according to the Porrettos.

The dispute eventually began to play out publicly in the local newspaper and culminated in 1997, when a GLO attorney told the park board that the state did not recognize any claim to private ownership of land in front of the seawall, the Porrettos claim.

Another attorney with the GLO then submitted an extensive column to the Galveston Daily News expounding on the state's position that it owned all land in front of the seawall, including Porretto Beach.

The Porrettos said that when potential buyers learned of the state's apparent claim to Porretto Beach, the buyers backed out, costing the family millions of dollars and prompting litigation.

Galveston Bay Home Makeover
21 Aug 2014
A design duo turns a fixer-upper on Galveston Bay into a nautically inspired beauty, perfect for a sea-loving family.

Michael Stuart's insight:

When two sailing enthusiasts had to temporarily table their dream of building a boat in order to raise their young crew of four, they set about looking for a new adventure. And that's exactly what they found in an aged, lackluster house on Galveston Bay in Texas.

Keep Rollover Pass Open
13 Mar 2013 Keep Rollover Pass Open   By Wayne Stupka and Ted Vega Recently, in a gross example of government overreaching in violation of private property rights, the General Land Office of the State of Texas went to the Corps of Engineers and applied for and received a permit to close Rollover Pass. Not only do they not own the land in question, they did not ask the owner of the land – the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club – - if they could. They just did it. If this wasn’t bad enough, they are seeking to remove the best public access fishing location on the Upper Texas Coast. It is a high quality recreational resource available to handicapped and less wealthy fishermen and women of the coast – persons who cannot afford boats and motors. Furthermore the grounds on which they are overreaching do not hold up. It is a land grab, pure and simple. Now, how would you feel if the government came to you and told you that they had applied for a permit to take action that would destroy your property? How many of you citizens out there would stand still for an arrogant, oppressive government agency telling you what they were going to do with your private property? And now because the General Land Office has no power of condemnation, the GLO is trying to force Galveston County to do their dirty work for them by asking – or perhaps coercing – the County into condemning our property on their behalf. To date, Galveston County has not acted, but let’s be clear. It will be a “gut check” on whether the members of Commissioners Court are really concerned about overreaching government or not. This is an issue that puts the rhetoric of support for private property rights to the test. So why are we closing the Pass? First, we are always told it is because of erosion. Unfortunately, the big erosion problem on the Upper Texas coast is that the source of sand for all of our beaches is not what it used to be. Rollover Pass is a small symptom of the larger disease of loss of sand supply due to dams up the Mississippi River. Shutting Rollover Pass is not going to solve the erosion problem on Bolivar or anywhere else. Severe storms such as Ike cause ten to a hundred times more erosion in one day across a hundred miles of beach than does Rollover Pass in a decade. If the jetties were constructed that were part of the original plan, the erosion issue – such as it is – would go away. Second, we are told that the problem is siltation of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway – that sediment comes through the Pass and is deposited in the canal and causes increased maintenance dredging costs. However, consider this. A diversion was recently constructed (and permitted by the Corps and the GLO) to allow the diversion of Taylor’s Bayou in Jefferson County southward into the GIWW about fifteen miles in from the easternmost point of East Bay. That diversion will dump incredibly large amounts of sediment into the GIWW – a much larger amount than is contributed by Rollover Pass. So if increased dredging were really a concern, that project would never have been allowed. Yet it was with full support by the very entities that are trying to shut down the Pass. Third, we are told that the GLO wishes to restore East Bay from an ecological perspective. To us, that sounded like a decent reason. But once again, this issue must be viewed in a cumulative context. The Taylor Bayou diversion mentioned above will divert millions and even billions of gallons of floodwaters into the GIWW and East Bay. That diversion is a new event. If Rollover Pass is closed, the ecology of East Bay will be dominated by freshwater inflow and will cease to function as a salt water fishery for long periods of time. The Taylor Bayou diversion is a much bigger threat than Rollover Pass. However, if the Pass is left open, the freshwater domination of the Taylor Bayou diversion would be moderated by an exchange with the Gulf of Mexico and East Bay will likely be just fine. With the Pass closed, East Bay is doomed. On the positive side, Rollover Pass is a poor fisherman’s dream. It offers truly quality fishing literally out of the back of your truck. You can drive right up to it. You can roll your wheel chair to it. It is open to all ethnicities and all classes of users. It is all about equality – equal access and equal rights. By shutting the Pass, the government will be taking private property from the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club for the supposed purpose of benefiting beachfront homeowners – homeowners who now own the majority of the beach after the Severance decision by the Texas Supreme Court. Why should the Club’s private property be condemned to help private property owners? Artist's concept of how Rollover Pass could look (click image for larger view). All of us involved in supporting the Pass – the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club and the Gilcrist Community Association – recognize that the Pass must be improved. We have produced an image of what it could and should be, and we believe that we can raise the money – private money, not government money – to build this newer and better Pass. But since Ike, the Club, the Gilchrist community and Rollover Pass have been under attack. All we ask is that the government leaves us alone – that we be allowed the chance to restore this fabulous recreation asset and get back to the business of providing quality fishing, bird watching and recreation to the residents of the Upper Coast. Wayne Stupka is President of the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club. Ted Vega is President of the Gilchrist Community Association.
ATV- ROV's frequently asked Questions by Galveston Sherriffs Dept.
06 Aug 2012 Frequently Asked Questions – ATV/ROV’s
ATV News
06 Aug 2012 Last month, a State Attorney General’s opinion provided some guidance for both operators and government officials about the use of all-terrain and recreational off-road vehicles (ATV/ROV’s) on Bolivar Peninsula beaches. 
Specks on a Fly- “UBETCHA” by Ed Snyders
05 Dec 2011 Rolling out a cast to the grassy edge of the salt-marsh settled my streamer right on top of a swirl left by a feeding trout, when, after a few quick line jerks, the reaction for the action "imploded" on it bowing the fly rod to the fight of speckled silver.  
Those Amazing GULP! Ed Snyder/Outdoors Bolivar Peninsula, TX.
28 Nov 2011 Massaging my jig along the bottom as it drifted with the tide I could feel every grain of sand and click of shell as it thumped its way along a submerged sandbar. Then, a sudden, aggressive “TIC” triggered my hook-set into a big fish, a strong fish. Arching rod and a reset drag prepared me for a long, hard fight…. “Gulp” had paid off for me again with a nice 22inch doormat sized flounder coming to net.
Page 1 2 3
Oil Spill Money Helps Texas Protect Coast
26 Aug 2014

Money paid by BP and Transocean to settle criminal penalties arising from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill has helped Texas close the largest conservation land purchase in the state’s history: Just over 17,000 acres of undisturbed coastal prairie in Calhoun County for $50 million.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation (the non-profit fundraising arm of the state’s parks department) will raise the balance of the funds — about $15 million after the oil spill funds are applied. The foundation would initially be a joint owner of the land, alongside other non-profit conservation organizations; eventually, the plan is for the land to be donated to the department itself.

Conservationists and environmental advocates hailed the purchase as a significant move to protect the state’s coast, which experts estimate is losing hundreds of acres of rural land each day. Conserving rural lands, they said, is crucial not only for preserving open spaces in Texas, but also as a way to protect water resources. Along the coast, keeping land undeveloped can serve as a “natural buffer” against sea-level rise and storm surges — often a much cheaper way to ensure hurricane protection than costly infrastructure like seawalls.

http://www.texastribune.org/2014/08/21/texas-announces-land-conservation-purchase-bp-doll/

Scientific Reasons A Texas Beach Vacation Is Necessary For Your Health
26 Aug 2014

If you don't already have a Texas size beach vacation planned, marine biologist Wallace J. Nichols's new book will make you.

Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In , On, Or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, And Better At What You Do is the result of over 10 years of research that shows how looking at water, being around it or in it coaxes our brains into releasing happy chemicals such as dopamine, serotonin and oxytocin.

Beach Vacation picture courtesy of Cinnamon Shore Port Aransas Texas


Michael Stuart's insight:

Water returns us to our natural state - This biological connection to water, Nichols told CBS News, triggers an immediate response in our brains.

We're more relaxed along the coast -  Areas of the brain associated with less stress and more empathy are activated when we look at nature scenes. While pictures of urban landscapes elicited activity in the parts of our brains associated with stress.

Looking at pictures is good, but water is even better, Water rejuvenates a tired mind


The color Blue soothes - Blue, it turns out, is the world's favorite color.

See the book at: wallacejnichols.org/126/585/bluemind

U.S. sells acreage off Texas coast to energy companies
22 Aug 2014
An auction for acreage in the western Gulf of Mexico drew more than $100 million in high bids from energy companies, the Interior Department said.

Michael Stuart's insight:

Acreage up for auction in Lease Sale 238 could lead to the production of between 116 million and 200 million barrels of oil and 538 billion and 938 billion cubic feet of natural gas - the U.S. Interior Department

The Gulf of Mexico has been and will continue to be a cornerstone of our domestic energy portfolio, with vital energy resources that spur economic opportunities and further reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

Lease sales included under a five-year energy plan outlined by President Barack Obama have generated $2.3 billion in bid revenues. A consortium of energy industry leaders called the White House to open even more offshore areas to explorers when planning the next five-year plan, which would end in 2022.

The Texas coast has an energetic future!

Texas High Court Asked To Revise Beach Property Ruling
22 Aug 2014

The First District Court reversed in favor of the state, and in July the Texas Supreme Court affirmed, with the modification that the trial court should not have awarded the Porrettos ownership of land seaward of the mean higher high-tide mark.


Michael Stuart's insight:

The Texas General Land Office told the state Supreme Court on that members of a Galveston family cannot seek judicial clarification of their property rights following the reversal of their $5 million award in litigation over the agency’s effort to seize a private beach.

In a motion for rehearing, the GLO said that while it agrees with the Texas Supreme Court’s decision to not revive a $5 million award to the Porretto family that was thrown out by a lower appeals court, the high court incorrectly concluded that the Porrettos were entitled to a declaratory judgment defining exactly what property they own.

Because the Porrettos had abandoned a “trespass to try title” action, which is the exclusive remedy under Texas law for determining who owns a disputed tract of real property, the high court was without authority to remand the case for a final judgment on the family’s property rights, the GLO claimed.

“Respectfully, the court was confined to the relief the Porrettos requested,” the motion said. “A party is not entitled to relief it does not seek.”

An attorney for the Porrettos told Law360 Tuesday that his clients have also asked for reconsideration of the ruling and suggested that the GLO filed the motion as an effort to give the high court a possible way out should it have a change of heart about the family's argument that the state committed a "temporary taking" of their property.

In July, the high court refused to revive a $5 million judgment the family scored after a state trial court concluded the GLO wrongfully laid claim to Porretto Beach and effectively killed offers from developers lined up to buy the land.

Although the state publicly claimed it owned the family’s property — then later admitted it didn't, after several offers on the property were rescinded — the Porrettos didn't suffer a “temporary taking” of their land and therefore weren't entitled to recover damages, the Texas Supreme Court ruled.

But the high court said that the family was entitled to a declaratory judgment defining their property rights and remanded the case for a final order to that effect. Instead, a decision from the First District Court of Appeals throwing out the Porrettos’ case altogether should have simply been affirmed, according to the GLO.

The fight between the Porrettos and the state involved land the family has owned for more than 40 years, including Porretto Beach, which runs along the seawall in Galveston between Sixth and 10th streets and several additional parcels the family owns between Sixth and 27th streets.

In 1994, the state leased submerged lands between 10th and 103rd streets to the city of Galveston for a beach renourishment project, according to the Porrettos.

The GLO claimed the state's property covered by the lease extended from the coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico to the annual high-tide mark, which abutted the seawall, swallowing the Porrettos' land.

But the family objected, arguing that the measurement should have been taken from roughly the “mean higher high-tide line,” which would have left them with some beach property between the seawall and the area targeted by the state for renourishment.

Rejecting the Porrettos' argument, the state went forward with the project and told the Galveston Park Board that it could issue concession licenses to allow private vendors on the rebuilt beach, according to the Porrettos.

The dispute eventually began to play out publicly in the local newspaper and culminated in 1997, when a GLO attorney told the park board that the state did not recognize any claim to private ownership of land in front of the seawall, the Porrettos claim.

Another attorney with the GLO then submitted an extensive column to the Galveston Daily News expounding on the state's position that it owned all land in front of the seawall, including Porretto Beach.

The Porrettos said that when potential buyers learned of the state's apparent claim to Porretto Beach, the buyers backed out, costing the family millions of dollars and prompting litigation.

Galveston Bay Home Makeover
21 Aug 2014
A design duo turns a fixer-upper on Galveston Bay into a nautically inspired beauty, perfect for a sea-loving family.

Michael Stuart's insight:

When two sailing enthusiasts had to temporarily table their dream of building a boat in order to raise their young crew of four, they set about looking for a new adventure. And that's exactly what they found in an aged, lackluster house on Galveston Bay in Texas.

Keep Rollover Pass Open
13 Mar 2013 Keep Rollover Pass Open   By Wayne Stupka and Ted Vega Recently, in a gross example of government overreaching in violation of private property rights, the General Land Office of the State of Texas went to the Corps of Engineers and applied for and received a permit to close Rollover Pass. Not only do they not own the land in question, they did not ask the owner of the land – the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club – - if they could. They just did it. If this wasn’t bad enough, they are seeking to remove the best public access fishing location on the Upper Texas Coast. It is a high quality recreational resource available to handicapped and less wealthy fishermen and women of the coast – persons who cannot afford boats and motors. Furthermore the grounds on which they are overreaching do not hold up. It is a land grab, pure and simple. Now, how would you feel if the government came to you and told you that they had applied for a permit to take action that would destroy your property? How many of you citizens out there would stand still for an arrogant, oppressive government agency telling you what they were going to do with your private property? And now because the General Land Office has no power of condemnation, the GLO is trying to force Galveston County to do their dirty work for them by asking – or perhaps coercing – the County into condemning our property on their behalf. To date, Galveston County has not acted, but let’s be clear. It will be a “gut check” on whether the members of Commissioners Court are really concerned about overreaching government or not. This is an issue that puts the rhetoric of support for private property rights to the test. So why are we closing the Pass? First, we are always told it is because of erosion. Unfortunately, the big erosion problem on the Upper Texas coast is that the source of sand for all of our beaches is not what it used to be. Rollover Pass is a small symptom of the larger disease of loss of sand supply due to dams up the Mississippi River. Shutting Rollover Pass is not going to solve the erosion problem on Bolivar or anywhere else. Severe storms such as Ike cause ten to a hundred times more erosion in one day across a hundred miles of beach than does Rollover Pass in a decade. If the jetties were constructed that were part of the original plan, the erosion issue – such as it is – would go away. Second, we are told that the problem is siltation of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway – that sediment comes through the Pass and is deposited in the canal and causes increased maintenance dredging costs. However, consider this. A diversion was recently constructed (and permitted by the Corps and the GLO) to allow the diversion of Taylor’s Bayou in Jefferson County southward into the GIWW about fifteen miles in from the easternmost point of East Bay. That diversion will dump incredibly large amounts of sediment into the GIWW – a much larger amount than is contributed by Rollover Pass. So if increased dredging were really a concern, that project would never have been allowed. Yet it was with full support by the very entities that are trying to shut down the Pass. Third, we are told that the GLO wishes to restore East Bay from an ecological perspective. To us, that sounded like a decent reason. But once again, this issue must be viewed in a cumulative context. The Taylor Bayou diversion mentioned above will divert millions and even billions of gallons of floodwaters into the GIWW and East Bay. That diversion is a new event. If Rollover Pass is closed, the ecology of East Bay will be dominated by freshwater inflow and will cease to function as a salt water fishery for long periods of time. The Taylor Bayou diversion is a much bigger threat than Rollover Pass. However, if the Pass is left open, the freshwater domination of the Taylor Bayou diversion would be moderated by an exchange with the Gulf of Mexico and East Bay will likely be just fine. With the Pass closed, East Bay is doomed. On the positive side, Rollover Pass is a poor fisherman’s dream. It offers truly quality fishing literally out of the back of your truck. You can drive right up to it. You can roll your wheel chair to it. It is open to all ethnicities and all classes of users. It is all about equality – equal access and equal rights. By shutting the Pass, the government will be taking private property from the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club for the supposed purpose of benefiting beachfront homeowners – homeowners who now own the majority of the beach after the Severance decision by the Texas Supreme Court. Why should the Club’s private property be condemned to help private property owners? Artist's concept of how Rollover Pass could look (click image for larger view). All of us involved in supporting the Pass – the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club and the Gilcrist Community Association – recognize that the Pass must be improved. We have produced an image of what it could and should be, and we believe that we can raise the money – private money, not government money – to build this newer and better Pass. But since Ike, the Club, the Gilchrist community and Rollover Pass have been under attack. All we ask is that the government leaves us alone – that we be allowed the chance to restore this fabulous recreation asset and get back to the business of providing quality fishing, bird watching and recreation to the residents of the Upper Coast. Wayne Stupka is President of the Beaumont Rod, Reel and Gun Club. Ted Vega is President of the Gilchrist Community Association.
ATV- ROV's frequently asked Questions by Galveston Sherriffs Dept.
06 Aug 2012 Frequently Asked Questions – ATV/ROV’s
ATV News
06 Aug 2012 Last month, a State Attorney General’s opinion provided some guidance for both operators and government officials about the use of all-terrain and recreational off-road vehicles (ATV/ROV’s) on Bolivar Peninsula beaches. 
Specks on a Fly- “UBETCHA” by Ed Snyders
05 Dec 2011 Rolling out a cast to the grassy edge of the salt-marsh settled my streamer right on top of a swirl left by a feeding trout, when, after a few quick line jerks, the reaction for the action "imploded" on it bowing the fly rod to the fight of speckled silver.  
Those Amazing GULP! Ed Snyder/Outdoors Bolivar Peninsula, TX.
28 Nov 2011 Massaging my jig along the bottom as it drifted with the tide I could feel every grain of sand and click of shell as it thumped its way along a submerged sandbar. Then, a sudden, aggressive “TIC” triggered my hook-set into a big fish, a strong fish. Arching rod and a reset drag prepared me for a long, hard fight…. “Gulp” had paid off for me again with a nice 22inch doormat sized flounder coming to net.
Page 1 2 3
Bring Back Bolivar

Visit the Bolivar Ike Recovery page on the Bolivar Chamber site for more information about our recovery progress.

Show your support to restore the Beautiful Bolivar Peninsula. Please click here to sign the "Bring Back Bolivar" support roster.


Purchase your Bring Back Bolivar T-Shirt. All proceeds benefit the Bolivar Peninsula Economic Development Fund. Call now to order 409-684-3345.

Visit the Bolivar Ike Recovery page on the Bolivar Chamber site for more information about our recovery progress.

Show your support to restore the Beautiful Bolivar Peninsula. Please click here to sign the "Bring Back Bolivar" support roster.


Purchase your Bring Back Bolivar T-Shirt. All proceeds benefit the Bolivar Peninsula Economic Development Fund. Call now to order 409-684-3345.

Contact

Swedes Real Estate Logo

Swede's Real Estate
Physical Address: 2840 Hwy 87

Mailing Address: Po Box 1158

Crystal Beach, TX 77650

Phone 409-684-3345

Sitemap

Anne Willis Broker


Your Crystal Beach Bolivar Peninsula - Beach Property Expert - a member of the TexasGulfCoastOnline network

Swedes Real Estate Logo

Swede's Real Estate
Physical Address: 2840 Hwy 87

Mailing Address: Po Box 1158

Crystal Beach, TX 77650

Phone 409-684-3345

Sitemap

Anne Willis Broker


Your Crystal Beach Bolivar Peninsula - Beach Property Expert - a member of the TexasGulfCoastOnline network